Blog channels
Subscribe to email newsletter
Newsletter about study in Holland.
Issued 1–2 times a week.
See archive.

University Maastricht best in education

21 November 2005, 13:54

The quality of the education at Universiteit Maastricht is good and consistent. For the second year in a row UM does very well in ‘Kennis in Kaart’, the quality measurement carried out annually by the ministry of Education, Culture and Science in universities and universities of professional education.

The quality of the education at Universiteit Maastricht is good and consistent. For the second year in a row UM does very well in ‘Kennis in Kaart’, the quality measurement carried out annually by the ministry of Education, Culture and Science in universities and universities of professional education. No less than four of the six Maastricht programmes are ranked highest.

Also Maastricht students are the quickest to graduate compared to students of other Dutch universities (62 per cent). Where other rankings are based on opinions of involved persons, ‘Kennis in Kaart’ is based upon objective parameters and quality assurance assessments by experts. The four Maastricht programmes that appeared the best in the Netherlands are Economics, Medicine, Knowledge Engineering and Health Sciences.

The programmes of Law and Business Administration come second after respectively the universities of Groningen and Rotterdam. On the other hand, Law in Maastricht is the faculty of law with the highest study output, meaning the number of students that does not exceed the officially set number of years to finish the degree by more than two years. Frank Thuijsman, programme director of Knowledge Engineering is very satisfied with the good results of his programme.

When asked about the specific topics for which ‘his’ programme was awarded the qualification ‘excellent’, he answers: “Especially the educational and learning environment is much appreciated. We have our own variety here of the Problem Based Learning model, and that is Project Based Learning. Students work together in groups of maximum six persons on a project that is linked to the theory and often focused on current events.

We did, for example, a project with Vodafone about the mobile telephone system. It is very motivating for students when the theory is actually connected to practical applications.” Barbara Sauter, sixth-year student in International Business and also project coordinator of the Eurotop for Top Students that presently takes place in Maastricht will graduate next year. ‘Here in Maastricht the general idea is that you ‘properly’ graduate within four or five years.

When you are a student in your sixth year, people automatically assume that you were a board member of for example the ‘Inkom’ besides your studies. Or, in fact, organized a Eurotop.” In this area, especially the Faculty of Law scores high with 53% compared to other law faculties. Rector Magnificus Gerard Mols (professor of criminal law and criminal procedure): ‘One of the instruments to keep up the pace of students is the Binding Study Advice.

This was introduced in the Faculty of Law a few years ago. I think we can be very proud of this result. In general I believe that Problem Based Learning also leads to positive assessments by content experts as well as experts from experience.” A ‘hands-on’ expert is for example student Clarissa van Oijen, fifth-year student of Fiscal law. “For me, the PBL method is the best system because I perform better in small groups than in a full lecture room.

Then I soon loose my concentration. That is one of the reasons I chose for Maastricht, but of course also because it is a very pleasant university town.” Sarah Pranger, third-year bachelor student in European Studies (part of Arts and Culture) meets many foreign students in the course of her studies.

She sees that PBL students are different from students who don’t work with PBL, but study with more traditional teaching methods. ‘Maastricht students are more practical, whereas they have more ready knowledge. They often know much more about classics such as Aristotle and Plato. I never had to learn knowledge by heart. But I don’t assume I will often have to deal with Plato later in my professional practice.”

Do you like this page? Thank you for the vote! 7 3
Rating: 7.0 / 10 (votes: 10)




Comments (0) Comment the article

Comment the article
Please fill in your name
This email is incorrect
Please write something